Daredevils on Etna prepare to Ski Down Erupting Volcano

 

The sight of an erupting volcano might deter most from getting near it, but daredevils in Italy refused to succumb to the explosion as these pictures prove.

Mount Etna, on the southern Italian island of Sicily, blew up for the fourth time this year, but despite molten lava spewing down, a group of skiers managed to capture the effects up close.

The party then sailed down its slopes which attracts thousands of visitors each year.

Skiers capture Mount Etna's eruption as it spews lava on the southern Italian island of Sicily (Photo Reuters) - Sky Today

Skiers capture Mount Etna’s eruption as it spews lava on the southern Italian island of Sicily (Photo Reuters) – Sky Today

Etna scales 11,000ft and is 18 miles above the Sicilian town of Catania, sent a four mile trail of smoke and ash into the sky.

Whilst nearby airports remained opened, officials shut down two nearby flight paths as a safety precaution following the explosion.

Catania which has an estimated population just shy of 300,000, last witnessed a similar eruption in May 2011.

On that occasion, the main airport was forced to shut down and fears grew over the safety of cyclists that were taking part in the Giro d’Italia cycle race stage between Messina and Etna.

Mount Etna has erupted four times in the last year forcing authorities to close down nearby flight paths (Photo Reuters) - Sky Today

Mount Etna has erupted four times in the last year forcing authorities to close down nearby flight paths (Photo Reuters) – Sky Today

A family, left, gaze at the blast and right, Mount Etna is seen from the city of Catania as it spews lava and smoke (Photo Reuters) - Sky Today

A family, left, gaze at the blast and right, Mount Etna is seen from the city of Catania as it spews lava and smoke (Photo Reuters) – Sky Today

Just days ago, thrill-seekers in Central America filmed themselves as they sledged down the side of an active volcano.

Adrenalin junkie Matt Karsten and his mate flew down the side of the Cerro Negro volcano in Nicaragua,with just a tiny wooden sled to guide them down the steep ashy slopes.

They managed to negotiate their way down the 728-metre volcano in just under four minutes – gaining speeds of up to 50mph.

Two adrenalin-junkies kick up ash and stones as they fly down the slope of the Cerro Negro volcano in Nicaragua on sleds (Photo Caters News Agency) - Sky Today

Two adrenalin-junkies kick up ash and stones as they fly down the slope of the Cerro Negro volcano in Nicaragua on sleds (Photo Caters News Agency) – Sky Today

Matt, right, and a friend survey the landscape before hitting the slopes (Photo Caters News Agency) - Sky Today

Matt, right, and a friend survey the landscape before hitting the slopes (Photo Caters News Agency) – Sky Today

Matt, a web designer from Miami, USA, said: ‘I wanted to try volcano boarding because it sounded like a bit of a crazy adrenalin rush.

‘When there’s no snow to go sledging in, volcanic ash seemed like the next best thing.

‘How many people can say they’ve sped down an active volcano on a little piece of wood?’

Karsten speeds through a hail of debris as he reaches speeds of up to 50mph down the 728-metre volcano  (Photo Caters News Agency) - Sky Today

Karsten speeds through a hail of debris as he reaches speeds of up to 50mph down the 728-metre volcano (Photo Caters News Agency) – Sky Today

Matt lies flat on his back after taking a tumble at high speed  (Photo Caters News Agency) - Sky Today

Matt lies flat on his back after taking a tumble at high speed (Photo Caters News Agency) – Sky Today

VIDEO: Matt Karsten flies down the side of the Cerro Negro volcano in Nicaragua

By DAILY MAIL REPORTER

Source: dailymail



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